Home > Entrepreneurship, Technology, Venture Capital / Private Equity > India: excellent services but what is holding back tech products?

India: excellent services but what is holding back tech products?

Preetham, the founder at a retail software products company in Bangalore called Quantama asked the question on LinkedIn after an insightful posting on the topic at http://ow.ly/1qY3y.  My response sparked more questions and is worth reproducing my comments here as a blog post.

I believe that we need all of the following at a minimum to create a successful products company:

  1. A big market, hopefully global
  2. A visionary product that solves a real problem
  3. Excellent product development team
  4. Top tier product management
  5. Stellar product marketing
  6. A world class sales and marketing engine

As Preetham says  on his blog, vision is important and we do have that in some measure in India but most product companies here struggle on all counts of which 4,5,6 are the biggest problems.    Sales is a matter of execution and picking the right sales model and sales team will help greatly.   More worryingly, most of Indian tech companies do not grasp product management and marketing well and I try to demystify it in a separate post.

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  1. March 29, 2010 at 7:44 am

    Shyam,

    Totally on board with you regarding the lack of good product management and marketing.

    My add to that : unlike a services company where the cheque at the end of the month tells you you’re executing well, a product company has to make the decisions up front – in effect, making a bet – before the money flows in, if at all. What this means is that you have to make your decisions in advance, and few people have the market exposure or judgment to make those calls. Decades of mai-baap sarkar have removed any reason to show any vestige of accountability or real initiative; and botched implementations of “matrixed” decision-making have made it worse. Getting people to make decisions and holding them accountable is, in my opinion, the #1 cultural change that needs to happen in India.

    It’s what we do first at MoovieShoovie. We give responsibilities, not just tasks, to new employees. In effect, we turn them all into product managers so that they can manage their own areas successfully.

  2. March 29, 2010 at 7:45 am

    Shyam,

    Totally on board with you regarding the lack of good product management and marketing.

    My add to that : unlike a services company where the cheque at the end of the month tells you you’re executing well, a product company has to make the decisions up front – in effect, making a bet – before the money flows in, if at all. What this means is that you have to make your decisions in advance, and few people have the market exposure or judgment to make those calls. Decades of mai-baap sarkar have removed any reason to show any vestige of accountability or real initiative; and botched implementations of “matrixed” decision-making have made it worse. Getting people to make decisions and holding them accountable is, in my opinion, the #1 cultural change that needs to happen in India.

    It’s what we do first at MoovieShoovie. We give responsibilities, not just tasks, to new employees. In effect, we turn them all into product managers so that they can manage their own areas successfully.

    Jo

    • Shyam Kamadolli
      March 30, 2010 at 3:21 pm

      I agree with you – the lay entrepreneur lacks the ability to make “investment” decisions in intangibles like ideas, effort, time based on future payoffs. But they seem to do quite well with real assets. Funny you should reference product management; its my pet peeve of the month that we do not have enough or good talent for it. Product management is the achilles heel of our growth story in my opinion.

  3. July 5, 2010 at 4:34 pm

    Hi Shyam –

    I saw this post now, thx for the link. The name of the company is ‘Quantama’ which has been mis-spelt in your blog :) Just a update.

    Regards,
    Preetham V V

    • Shyam Kamadolli
      July 5, 2010 at 7:19 pm

      Sorry about the typo – fixed now and linked!

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